Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment (CI/CD)

Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment, CI/CD, modernizes application development practices and speeds up application development and deployment. Knowing what services and resources exist in a consistent way makes building, deploying and updating applications and solutions not only easier but quicker. FP Complete are experts in delivering these services including helping you automate deployments to test or validate acceptance environments.

Building software as suites of collaborative services, known as microservices, takes into account the requirements of all of your applications and solutions as well as your cloud environment.

Microservices allow more effective CI/CD by delivering basic resources in a way that an application developer can build their solution in any language they choose. Because microservices are inherently reusable, companies are able to realize lower cost and more agile development.

Continuous Integration, or CI, is about automatically building, testing, and optionally creating a runnable archive of your project. It typically runs on every commit pushed to your version control system (VCS), such as Git. Sometimes more expensive integration tests only run on stable branches like master or staging, depending on your VCS workflows.

There are some semi-obvious benefits to adopting CI:

  • You get immediate feedback on flaws in a pull request
  • You find out quickly if a bad commit landed, before it disrupts your entire team’s workflow

But the biggest advantage of CI is an implicit one: standardizing how to build your project. All too often, without CI, the dev, ops, and quality teams will end up building software differently, resulting in different runtime behavior (or failed builds!). By having one official source of truth, we can avoid such problems.

Read more about Containerization.

Providing shorter release cycles and more flexibility are key requirements of an agile DevOps environment.

Deploying software to production is one of the most gut-wrenching experiences many engineers face. Bugs, missed steps and unexpected machine states can cause a deployment to fail. Continuous Deployment, or CD, minimizes the input of the engineer in the deployment process. Just like CI automates the process of building and testing software, CD automates the deployment. This involves an upfront cost of defining a scriptable method of updating your servers. Paying the upfront costs in a consistent way pays dividends over the long term and helps you achieve immutable infrastructure.

There are many different CI tools available today. Jenkins, Travis, Azure, Gitlab, CircleCI, etc.. Our main criteria for any tool is that your CI build process should be in your code repository.

On the deployment side, we recommend sticking to container-based deployment systems. Read more about Containerization.

Continuous Integration, or CI, is about automatically building, testing, and optionally creating a runnable archive of your project. It typically runs on every commit pushed to your version control system (VCS), such as Git. Sometimes more expensive integration tests only run on stable branches like master or staging, depending on your VCS workflows.

There are some semi-obvious benefits to adopting CI:

  • You get immediate feedback on flaws in a pull request
  • You find out quickly if a bad commit landed, before it disrupts your entire team’s workflow

But the biggest advantage of CI is an implicit one: standardizing how to build your project. All too often, without CI, the dev, ops, and quality teams will end up building software differently, resulting in different runtime behavior (or failed builds!). By having one official source of truth, we can avoid such problems.

Read more about Containerization.

Providing shorter release cycles and more flexibility are key requirements of an agile DevOps environment.

Deploying software to production is one of the most gut-wrenching experiences many engineers face. Bugs, missed steps and unexpected machine states can cause a deployment to fail. Continuous Deployment, or CD, minimizes the input of the engineer in the deployment process. Just like CI automates the process of building and testing software, CD automates the deployment. This involves an upfront cost of defining a scriptable method of updating your servers. Paying the upfront costs in a consistent way pays dividends over the long term and helps you achieve immutable infrastructure.

There are many different CI tools available today. Jenkins, Travis, Azure, Gitlab, CircleCI, etc.. Our main criteria for any tool is that your CI build process should be in your code repository.

On the deployment side, we recommend sticking to container-based deployment systems. Read more about Containerization.